Tired of your asphalt buckling?

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blog for 05112017 tired of your asphalt buckling 3

Now that the snow and ice have melted off your driveway, you will probably be surprised by the damage that was not there last fall. If your driveway could talk, it would say that it needs some repairs as well as regular care and maintenance.

In these northern states, buckling can be caused by frost heave in the spring or even from driving very heavy vehicles or machinery on the driveway repeatedly. CBS visits many sites where the asphalt has buckled as much as eight inches between winter freeze and spring time.

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Many times upon excavation of the driveways, we find that not only is the soil comprised of organic clay, but many times, eluvial clay is also present. These two soils should always be removed prior to laying asphalt atop, as they will never dry out, and the freeze cycle will turn the wet clay into a larger ice cube.

The other issue that we find every day, is the installation of an insulation board under the soil, between the block foundation and the wet soils. This insulation board not only traps water at the block foundation, it also creates absolutely no thermal break, as many contractors believe it does.

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As you can see in the pics, the trapped water eats away at the block and helps the wet clay to retain more liquid, exacerbating the freeze/thaw cycle. When builders/developers put in driveways and sidewalks, there should always be a soil correction of poor soils, and the sub rate beneath the asphalt topping should be no less than “cobit” that will compact to a density of 95 percent to ensure the asphalt will retain its elevation.

If you see your concrete or asphalt toppings move at your home, winter to spring…call CBS for an evaluation!

Heaving Concrete and Asphalt – Subgrade

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In Minnesota, there are some excellent references that can be used as a guide for the design and construction of residential driveways. However, what is needed is a code that addresses the key elements of a driveway structure. I find it fascinating that there is nothing in the code that addresses the design or the construction of a residential driveway.

In my professional opinion, the key elements to a properly designed residential driveway are as follows: the proper subgrade with the required compaction, a solid base upon which the driveway material will rest (this blog is based on an asphalt driveway), the right asphalt thickness, and once the driveway is constructed, preventing water from entering the subgrade (water management system).

Proper Subgrade

What is a proper subgrade? The answer – one that is NOT prone to frost heaving.  Damage from frost heaving can result in the buckling of garage door trim which can cause the misalignment of your garage door. This misalignment can make it difficult to open and close the door.

Buckling of garage door tripm. Clay soils push concrete soils upward in winter.

Buckling of garage door apron. Clay soils pushes concrete soils upward in winter.

The subgrade should either be granular or con-bit.  Most subgrades today consist of clays and silts, soils that are considered expansive – these materials are not the proper subgrade.  If you have subgrade consisting of clays and silts, it should be removed and replaced with granular material or con–bit (this is normally referred to as a soil correction). Here at CBS we recommend using con-bit rather than granular material. Whether it is con-bit or granular it must be compacted and it should be compacted in lifts. Each lift should be about 8-10 inches. Once the subgrade is prepared then the base is constructed.

Concrete and asphalt can move as much as 8 inches when the soil beneath it freezes.

Concrete and asphalt can move as much as 8 inches when the soil beneath it freezes.

Many driveway problems occur right in front of the garage door. This is an area where the native soils are used for backfilling and they are seldom compacted properly and are often placed wet. This area is prone to becoming “wetter” over time because other elements feed moisture into it (poor water management systems). Disregarding this compaction and allowing the subgrade to become saturated are the key reasons why driveways settle and are subjected to frost heaving.

 

Moisture Intrusion Solutions: Solid Base & Asphalt Thickness

The next element of importance in a pavement structure is the base. The base is the layer directly below the driveway surface (either asphalt or concrete). AS previously stated, this article is based on a hot mixed asphalt driveway. The base material, in my opinion should be a class V material or con-bit (recycled concrete and asphalt). The thickness of the base will depend upon the thickness of the asphalt.

Let me explain – the design of the pavement structure should be based upon a term called “Granular Equivalent” (GE). The granular equivalent concept defines a pavement section by equating the thickness of the base and asphalt layer to an equivalent thickness of granular base material. Note: this is not my term, but a term used by the Minnesota Department of Transportation (MN/DOT) for designing pavement sections.

As an example, a class 5 aggregate base has a granular equivalent of 1 per inch of thickness and an asphalt course has a granular equivalent of 2.25 per inch of material.  So, if I have an asphalt thickness of 3 inches, and a class 5 course of five inches, my granular equivalent would be 11.75 inches. If I had an asphalt thickness of 2 inches and a class 5 base of seven inches, my granular equivalent would be 11.50 inches.

So, you see the granular equivalent can be any combination of asphalt and base. It goes without saying that the higher the GE number, the better the pavement structure (I have personally seen this to be true).  Low GE’s might not show pavement distress in the first few years but within 3-7 years, signs of distress will begin showing up.

The next element in the pavement structure and the ones everyone sees, is the surface course. To be frank, I am not sure what specification most residential paving contractors use for their design mix. I have seen HMA thicknesses from 2” up to 3” used for driveways. I think most paving contractors will use 2”-2 ½”. Especially in large residential developments. If you are an individual homeowner the contractor will probably use 2 ½” – 3”. In my professional opinion, I would recommend 3” – 4”.

Now getting back to the GE. I would recommend a GE between 10.5”-12” for residential driveways. Similarly, for reference – the Minnesota Asphalt Pavement Association (MAPA) recommends a GE of 11.5” for driveways also.

Conclusion:

The building codes govern the applications of these materials and practices. Neither the IBC, nor the IRC include information for residential driveway designs. Nor is there a recognized national standard. Maybe it is far “fetched” of me to think that one could be established, but at the very least, I believe the Minnesota State Building Code should address the issue.

Incidentally, I have over 30 years of experience with the Hennepin County Department of Transportation dealing with bridge and roadway designs.

 

 

 

What is Wrong with my Windows?

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rotted window

Proper window installation is crucial to having a lasting home. The process should be thoughtfully planned out from start to finish because there are multiple steps that can leave your home vulnerable to degradation if they are not done properly.

Good windows are designed to last 30-50 years. However, a typical warranty provides coverage for only 10 years on average. One of the biggest reasons for this is that window manufacturers know how frequently improper home building practices actually occur. So, as a homeowner or management company how can you tell if your windows have been correctly installed?

Here are some signs that your windows were either installed improperly or are faulty:

-Moisture Intrusion

If you notice leaking from your windows, there is definitely a problem. This could be an array of construction defects including flashing or installation issues. Immediate action should be taken to avoid permanent water damage to your home.

-Drafty windows especially during winter months

Drafty windows are a sure sign that your windows are not insulated properly. This is concerning because around 10-25% of a home’s heat is lost through the windows. You are losing heat and paying big $$ for it.

-Difficulties opening, closing, or locking the window

If you are unable to open, close, or lock your new windows, it is likely it was installed improperly.

 -Fog or condensation has developed inside the window unit

Certain windows, such as double and triple-paned assemblies, are filled with safe gasses that aid in the energy efficiency of your home. When this gas becomes depleted, either naturally over time or because of improper installation, the pane will appear cloudy and/or have condensation. Be sure to clean the exterior of the window to verify that the moisture is within the pane.

-Frost on the inside of windows

Frost on the inside of windows is most likely from poor insulation or a bad seal. It presents a danger to your home because, upon melting, it transfers moisture to anything nearby causing cracked paint, discoloration of materials, and can even migrate to your home’s walls and cause water damage.

All of the above issues are indicative of poorly installed or faulty windows. It is important to have those checked by a professional to prevent any further damage that could be occurring within the home and/or energy loss. Complete Building Solutions, an engineering & consulting firm based out of the Twin Cities of Minnesota, specializes in home performance and has combined knowledge extending over 80 years. We would be happy to do an inspection for you. Check out our Facebook page and give us a call today!

(612) 868-2922

https://www.facebook.com/completebuildingsolutionsmn/

Choosing Ice-Melts

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Ice-Melts

As we speak, our social media newsfeeds are blowing up with snow warnings, schools are closing, business meetings are being rescheduled, and families are stocking up for the incoming storm in Minneapolis.  If you are making last minute runs to the store, be sure to acquire the proper ice-melt that fits your home’s needs. Below is a chart, put together by Consumer Reports, that can help you determine which product is right for your home.

Keep in mind that certain products effect asphalt and concrete differently. According to a recent study, magnesium products “are the most damaging to the concrete”, specifically Calcium magnesium acetate (Lee, 5). Within the same study, sodium chloride products were discovered to be the least detrimental to concrete.  As far as asphalt is concerned, acetate products can be disadvantageous because of their tendency “to break down the bonds between aggregate and asphalt binder” (consumer reports, 1).  The chart below provides many options for safe asphalt de-icers.

Ice-Melts Comparison

For more information and tips on de-icing best practices, check out the following link: http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/2014/02/best-ice-melts/index.htm .

 

If you are noticing large build-ups of ice around your home check out what our engineer and consultants have to say http://cbsmn.com/blog/?p=149 about PERMANENTLY fixing the problem.  

 

Sources:

“Best Rock Salt and Ice Melts Review – Consumer Reports.” Best Rock Salt and Ice Melts Review – Consumer Reports. N.p., Feb. 2014. Web. 02 Feb. 2016.

Lee, H., R. D. Cody, A. M. Cody, and P. G. Spry. EFFECTS OF VARIOUS DEICING CHEMICALS ON PAVEMENT CONCRETE DETERIORATION. Proc. of Mid-Continent Transportation Symposium 2000, Center for Transportation Research and Education, 2711 South Loop Drive. N.p.: n.p., 2000. 151-55. Print.

 

 

The Vices of Ices: How to get Rid of Ice at your Home

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Ice Dam Prevention MN

Minnesota winters produce harsh winds, dark skies, and snow. But, the most precarious weather consequence affecting, not only the elderly population, but all generations, is ice.  Ice is a rigid structure maintained by hydrogen bonds and forms when water is cooled below 32°F (0°C). It hosts many of our states favorite pastimes (shout out to the Minnesota Wild), but also poses danger to drivers, pedestrians, and homeowners who are simply trying to maneuver through the labyrinthine byways of a once secure driveway. Needless to say, this challenge is not always a success.

Incidentally, the leading cause of brain injuries in the state of Minnesota is from falls. The Minnesota Brain Injury Alliance and the Minnesota Department of Health say, falls are responsible for 38% of all brain injuries annually (https://www.braininjurymn.org/aboutBrain/falls.php). That is a huge number! Ideally, we would like to completely eradicate ice in order to decrease the injuries that coincide, but this is not realistic. However, individually, we can take measures to drastically decrease the problem within our own home.

First, one must be aware of the drainage system on their roof. A functioning roof system will shed moisture off the roof and into gutters where it can be properly filtered away from your foundation and walkways. If you have noticed ice dams, your roof is unable to perform because an issue exists within in your attic. It is important to note that a permanent solution, which does not require continual snow removal of the roof, exists and will increase the life of your roof and structural components of the attic. Check out our blog on attics & energy loss to learn more about the attic system http://cbsmn.com/blog/?p=121. At CBS, we specialize in these exact issues and offer lasting solutions to ensure peak energy efficiency, life span, and performance of your roof and attic.

Roof Ice Dams Solution

*This ice dam is preventing the roof’s drainage system from functioning properly.

A second factor to consider is the foundation of your home. It is paramount that water be directed away from the foundation to avoid ice build-up, but to also prevent basement leakage.

Charles Glossop, owner of Minnesota’s most highly esteemed commercial snow, landscaping, and consulting company, Hantho Farms, LLC, provided us with some of his methods (which CBS highly supports) for the best ways to prepare for this phenomena pre-winter: 1) Downspouts and gutters must be efficiently draining water away from entrances and walkways and 2) A positive slope must exist around the foundation, walkways, and driveways with at least a  6” drop in elevation within the first 10 feet of the foundation (International Residential Code). This positive slope encourages water to move away from your home and 3) Consult a professional before planting trees near your home. If trees are too close, their roots can actually grow into the foundation, causing cracks, and will retain water near the base of the home. If you combine a negative grade and trees in close proximity to a foundation, the tree roots will actually follow the water (which is trapped near foundation from negative grade) and may cause serious damage to the home’s foundation (International Residential Code).

Bad-grading

*The above photo demonstrates a gutter that is not draining water away from the foundation and a negative grade that is holding water near the foundation.

Now, we know it is mid-winter and your negative grade issues cannot be addressed until spring. However, there are some measures you can take NOW to prevent ice build-up. Charles Glossop suggests using a liquid brine BEFORE it snows to “prevent the bonding of snow to the pavement.” Check out Hantho Farms website http://www.hanthofarms.com to learn more about the liquid brine they make and use for commercial snow removal.

To recap, the two main sources that propagate ice are 1) an insufficient roof drainage system and 2) Improper drainage system of your foundation. After the recent snows, and upcoming freeze/thaw cycle, you will quickly know if there are problems within these drainage systems. If you have ice dams, slippery sidewalks, ice build-up on driveways, or around other areas of your home, you may need to start planning for next year. Call CBS to come inspect your property and start working towards a plan to create an efficient and safe environment at your home.

Leaks: Don’t Ignore the Unseen

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Roof Leakage

It is mid-January in Minnesota. We have seen temperatures plunge below zero and return to the mid-thirties (degrees Fahrenheit) multiple times. This varying temperature span is a recipe for attic leaks. Ultimately, the leakage problem exists because your attic system is failing somewhere.

A healthy attic means three things: first and foremost, the bypasses are sealed, two, an airflow is provided by correct ventilation, and three, the right amount of insulation pertinent to your area is present. To learn more about the attic system check out this blog post  http://cbsmn.com/blog/?p=121 .

When your attic is not performing at its peak, leakage can occur. Many homeowners assume that if a leak were present, it would be visible on the sheetrock surface of their home. This is NOT the case. When was the last time you visited your attic? You might be surprised at what you would find.

There are multiple ways that water can infiltrate your attic. One way is through condensation and frost. When your attic system is not functioning properly, warm air will escape through open bypasses and move into your attic. When this warm air meets the cold attic, it will stick to metals first and wood structures second. During periods of cold temperatures, this moisture will become visible as frost. When the weather begins to warm up, this frost will begin to thaw. All of this moisture has to go somewhere, so it leaks onto the attic insulation.

Another way moisture can enter the attic is through the build-up of ice dams. Again, these ice dams are formed because your attic is not performing adequately. As snow melts and water moves down your roof, the dam continues to build.  Water will search for ways to migrate underneath the shingles, through the roofing deck, and into the attic.

This dripping moisture from condensation & ice dams can cause mold to form, but more importantly, the insulation will become damp. Ultimately, this weakens the materials ability to resist heat flow (R-value=resistance to heat flow). It no longer acts as an insulator, but conversely, as a conductor of heat, allowing warm air to escape through your attic. In concurrence with the ineffective insulation, mold may also form on the roofing deck of the attic. The mold will continue to spread and break down the structural materials in your attic. Can you believe that all of this is may be occurring without you even knowing?

Ice build up on slate roof.

Because Minnesota is the 3rd coldest state in the United States (http://www.wdsu.com/weather/states-with-the-coldest-winters/22668580), it is even more important to ensure attic performance.  This is the time to call the Twin Cities premier engineering and consulting firm, Complete Building Solutions. Your attic will be assessed as a whole, and the proper course of action will be determined. We pride ourselves on our ability to create building solutions for your home that last.

Energy Savings

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Would you heat and cool your home with the front door and windows open?

Like me, many homeowners are look for energy savings in their homes because we know that energy prices will be and are skyrocketing! We check the efficiency of our furnaces, air conditioners, water heaters, kitchen appliances, bathroom ceiling fans scouring our home for ways to save mother earth and our pocketbooks. Checking your home’s performance is the place to start, the ceilings, attic, windows and other energy loss areas. Many homeowners think that spending thousands of dollars on new appliances will save them from dishing out big bucks on heating and cooling their homes. Start with calling Complete Building Solutions, we work with many homeowner associations and homeowners to make their homes perform and become more energy efficient. Read the testimonial below from one of our customers who were elated by our completion of the elimination of bypass, insulation and ventilation correction and saving money far above their expectations!

Complete Building Solutions has saved money for over 115 homeowner associations, townhome and condominium complexes (around 2,000 homeowners in the Twin Cities area alone). Our engineering firm has concrete methods to measure a home’s energy inefficiency and create a path to mending homes. Aside from a detailed attic visual inspection we can also offer infrared camera analytics, moisture testing and negative blower door testing. The negative blower door test determines how many CFM’s (cubic feet per minute) of energy your home is losing. These tests are sometimes done before we work on a home and after the work is completed and sometimes, over a two year period. Typically after a home’s performance is maximized by fixing heat loss areas, a homeowner can save around 25-50% on their energy bills. These savings and your investment will actually pay for themselves over a period of time.

One of our homeowners, Dr. Tracy was elated when we saved him just under 50% of on his energy costs:

“So, thanks again for a job well done! In addition to this very noticeable drop in natural gas usage, we are also noticing that we don’t have to keep the thermostat set as high to keep the house warm, the furnace doesn’t seem to run as often, the upstairs rooms are nice and warm (they were cold in years past), and, of course, no large scale ice build up along the roof lines anymore. There’s some ice in some corner spots but nowhere near as much as in years past.”

—Dr. Tracy

Natural Gas Usage

This bar graph shows Dr. Tracy’s actual gas bill before our assessment and execution of our recommended work scope (left F) and after (right F). These represent the difference in gas usage between February 2014 and February 2015.

Contact us when you are ready to analyze how you can keep the energy you pay for in your home and not giving it away to heat your neighborhood!

 

Why not Building Codes for residential driveways?

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Our company, Complete Building Solutions, investigates construction defects – including but not limited to the building envelope, water management issues, soil issues, settlement problems, concrete issues, and driveways. We also can provide engineering services and construction oversight.

As we conduct our investigations we have found that many of the defects observed do not comply with the building codes.  And, as most people know, the building industry is governed by codes. We rely on the International Building Code (IBC), the International Residential Code (IRC), and the Minnesota State Building Code as our references when conducting our investigations as we look for construction defects. They all do a good job of addressing all facets of a building. But, there is nothing in the code that addresses the design or the construction of a residential driveway.

In Minnesota, there are some excellent references that can be used as a guide for the design and construction. However, what is needed is a code that addresses the key elements of a driveway structure. In my opinion the key elements are having the proper subgrade with the required compaction, a solid base upon which the driveway material will rest (incidentally this blog is based on an asphalt driveway), the right asphalt thickness, and once the driveway is constructed keep the water from entering the subgrade (another words – a good water management system).

What is the proper subgrade? The answer – one that is not prone to frost heaving.  Damage from frost heaving can result in buckling your garage door trim to causing the misalignment of your garage door making it difficult to open and close.

Complete Building Inspections In MN

The subgrade should be either granular or should be con-bit.  I can tell you that most subgrades under driveways consist of clays and silts, soils that are considered expansive – those are not the proper subgrade.  So if you have subgrade consisting of clays and silts, it should be removed and replaced with granular material or con–bit (this is normally referred to as a soil correction). Here at CBS we recommend using con-bit rather than granular material. Whether it is con-bit or granular it must be compacted and it should be compacted in lifts. Each lift should be about 8-10 inches. Once the subgrade is prepared then the base is constructed.

The area where we see most of the driveway problems is right in front of the garage door. This is an area where the native soils are used for backfilling and they are seldom compacted properly and are placed wet. It is the area where the contractor has to excavate in order to install the footing and construct the foundation. Typically the excavation extends out from the building’s foundation several feet and extends down to the footing.

That is also the area that is most prone to become wetter over time because other elements feed moisture into it (poor water management for one). Disregarding compaction and allowing the subgrade to become saturated are the key reasons why driveways settle and are subjected to frost heaving.

Moisture Intrusion Solutions

As previously noted, poor water management can affect driveway behavior. Since the presence of water reduces the strength of the pavement structure, it is important to not let water enter it. I can’t tell you how many times I have seen downspouts dump huge amounts of water right next to the driveway.

The next element of importance in a pavement structure is the base. The base is the layer directly below the driveway surface (either asphalt or concrete). AS previously stated, this article is based on a hot mixed asphalt driveway. The base material, in my opinion should be a class V material or con-bit (recycled concrete and asphalt). The thickness of the base will depend upon the thickness of the asphalt.

Let me explain – the design of the pavement structure should be based upon a term called “Granular Equivalent” (GE). The granular equivalent concept defines a pavement section by equating the thickness of the base and asphalt layer to an equivalent thickness of granular base material. Note: this is not my term, but a term used by the Minnesota Department of Transportation (MN/DOT) for designing pavement sections.

As an example, a class 5 aggregate base has a granular equivalent of 1 per inch of thickness and an asphalt course has a granular equivalent of 2.25 per inch of material.  So, if I have an asphalt thickness of 3 inches, and a class 5 course of five inches, my granular equivalent would be 11.75 inches. If I had an asphalt thickness of 2 inches and a class 5 base of seven inches, my granular equivalent would be 11.50 inches.

So you see the granular equivalent can be any combination of asphalt and base. It goes without saying that the higher the GE number, the better the pavement structure (I have personally seen this to be true).  Low GE’s might not show pavement distress in the first few years but within 3-7years, signs of distress will begin showing up.

The next element in the pavement structure and the ones everyone sees, is the surface course. To be frank, I am not sure what specification most residential paving contractors use for their design mix. I have seen HMA thicknesses from 2” up to 3” used for driveways. I think most paving contractors will use 2”-2 ½”. Especially in large residential developments. If you are an individual homeowner the contractor will probably use 2 ½” – 3”.

In my professional opinion, I would recommend 3” – 4”.

Now getting back to the GE. I would recommend a GE between 10.5”-12” for residential driveways. Similarly, for reference – the Minnesota Asphalt Pavement Association (MAPA) recommends a GE of 11.5” for driveways also.

Conclusion:

Neither the IBC, nor the IRC include information for residential driveway designs. Nor is there a recognized national standard. Maybe it is far “fetched” of me to think that one could be established, but at the very least, I believe the Minnesota State Building Code should address the issue.

Incidentally, I have over 30 years of experience with the Hennepin County Department of Transportation dealing with bridge and roadway designs.

Bruce Polaczyk, P.E.

Ice Dams vs. Natural Ice Build-up

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I find that homeowners often confuse natural melt/freeze ice build-up with a systemic ice dam problem in their home.  I also often hear people say things like “ice dams cannot be stopped in Minnesota” or “nature causes ice dams, you cannot fix Mother Nature.”  This also leads me to the conclusion people need to learn to differentiate between the two occurrences.

Early February provided some interesting weather here in Minnesota.  Temperatures have fluctuated between dry, extremely cold days to days with weather near or just above freezing with a lot of moisture in the air.  We have seen a lot of natural ice build-up and several cases of hoarfrost which is less common in Minnesota due to dry weather in the winter.

Hoarfrost:

Hoarfrost is defined: “A grayish-white crystalline deposit of frozen water vapor formed in clear still weather on vegetation, fences, etc.”  Occasionally we wake up to this phenomenon and see these crystalline deposits on trees, fences etc.  You probably notice it mostly on trees.

You might wonder how this affects my home.  With high humidity in the air, condensation can occur in areas and freeze.  We often see this occur on plumbing stacks on a roof.  There are two conclusions when we find this issue; either it’s a one-time occurrence (hoarfrost) or it’s a systemic problem caused by condensation coming from the plumbing stack.

It is important to differentiate between the two.  If the plumbing stacks were installed improperly, the issue should be corrected.  We find that often they are cut too high off the roof elevation (more than 12”) and freezing will occur due to the install.  This should be corrected immediately.  However even when properly installed the plumbing vent may still freeze due to the moisture in the air (hoarfrost), this is a “one-time” occurrence or something that will happen infrequently and while clearing the ice is advised, there is not a problem that needs to be addressed.

Natural Ice Build-up vs. Ice Dams

We receive a handful of phone calls when the weather fluctuates between near or above freezing during the day and drops below freezing at night.  Most homeowners are concerned due to icicles forming on the eave or visible ice on the roof.  Again it is important to differentiate between Mother Nature and an ongoing problem with heat loss in your attic space.

Ice Dams form due to heat loss in the attic along with improper ventilation.  Attic bypass often allows warm air from the home into the attic and in turn it warms the roof deck.  This melts the snow on the roof, when the melt reaches the cold eave (overhang) it then freezes.  When there is enough ice built up and it reaches the warm area on the roof, water builds up behind the ice, working its way uphill and will often cause leaks in the attic.  This can lead to problems such as; leaks, mold, warped roof deck and deterioration of shingles.  Also, heat loss and bypass lead to other attic issues, most notably moisture issues.  I’ll to a whole blog about this in the future, stay tuned!

Even if all your heat loss is stopped and your ventilation is performing you can still have some ice form on your roof eave.  We see this happen with or without gutters, although more often when gutters are present.  When it snows, and either warms up near or above freezing during the day or the sun shines on the roof during the day and then at night the temperature drops, we see natural ice forming on roofs.  The most important distinction to make here is that there is no water sitting behind the ice or working its way uphill on the roof. Thus there is no problem with your attic.  Again, it’s ok to have a little ice on your eave or a few icicles as long as your attic is performing.

Natural Ice build-up

Natural Ice forming on a roof.

A saying that we repeat a lot around our office is that “gutters are a double edged sword.”  While they do help move roof water away from the foundation of your home, they do enhance the natural ice build-up on a roof eave.  Gutters along with the overhang are cold, so naturally when they will form ice in the winter.  Gutters are often necessary to move roof water, this only reinforces the need to properly insulate and ventilate your attic space.

Conclusion

While in most cases we still advise you have a professional inspect any potential issue, it is important to understand the difference between natural ice and ice formed from unnatural occurrences in your home, namely heat loss.  If your attic space is sealed and there is proper ventilation in your attic a little ice can be expected from time to time, but if you are seeing large amounts of ice or what you feel are ice dams, you should have a professional inspect your attic space and get a recommendation on how to remediate these issues.

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